How are people coping with games that just won’t run on Linux (aside from leaving them behind)? Do you dual boot Windows? Virtualize? What’s your strategy for this?

This will be extremely rare for me since I don’t play a lot of competitive stuff, but I’d love to find a solution. I have a large library, and it’s bound to happen from time to time.

  • Mereo@lemmy.ca
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    6 days ago

    I use Proton Experimental to play my games and they all work without exception. I’m in my late 30s, so I no longer play competitive games that have a kernel rootkit, I mean kernel anti-cheat.

    Basically, Linux gaming is like this: If you want to play competitive games with anti-cheat, stay or play in Windows. For all other games, play in Linux.

    • kurcatovium@lemm.ee
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      6 days ago

      Are you me? I used to play some online multiplayer games, but switching to linux (some 3 years ago?) and being less competitive came hand in hand. Now I enjoy single players only (with sprinkle of Path of Exile and World of Tanks (well, not really anymore)) and can’t understand why should I even consider going back to those toxic waters of competitive play… Am I officially old?

      • Mereo@lemmy.ca
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        6 days ago

        Haha. we’re officially old. I was an extremely competitive gamer back then. I played Quake 3, UT 99, Tribes 2, America’s Army, etc. I was even in a Tribes 2 squad and we basically practiced for tournaments every day.

        But now that life is stressful enough with the responsibilities I have, I just can’t play competitive games anymore. I just want to enjoy the story. I no longer have the stamina and the reflex for competitive games anymore.

    • circuitfarmer@lemmy.sdf.org
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      6 days ago

      This has generally been my experience as well. The sole exception: Distant Worlds. I’ve never, ever gotten it to run with any version of Proton.

  • BaumGeist@lemmy.ml
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    5 days ago

    aside from leaving them behind

    Why are we conforming to fit the software’s needs instead of vice-versa? Fuck the devs who can’t be assed to make it work for proton at the least. This isn’t my job, I’m not being paid to use software that goes against my values. There’s tens of thousands of games out there and I’m gonna let myself get so hung up on the few hundred that don’t work that i just go back to m$?

    Fuck. That. They deserve to get left behind. No piece of media is worth compronising on my values to consume.

  • Haijo@snac.haijo.eu
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    6 days ago

    this rarely happens, but when i run into a game that doesn’t work i - check protondb.com to see if someone else has already found a solution. trying different proton versions can sometimes help as well

    • Corroded@leminal.space
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      6 days ago

      The PCGamingWiki is also another good resource especially for older or more obscure games. Most fixes are Windows specific but they can be used on Linux. For example here is the page for Need for Speed III: Hot Pursuit where it links fan patches and an open source engine recreation.

      If someone is really desperate there’s always the option of searching GitHub issue pages like dxvk to see if it has been documented, if there is a temporary fix, if a fix is on the way, or if it’s going to remain a constant issue (ex. FiveM).

    • darcmage@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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      6 days ago

      Absolutely this. It is becoming increasingly rare to find a game that doesn’t work in linux (excluding stupid copy protection/anti-cheat implementations). We haven’t reached the works-out-of-the-box stage but the combination of proton-ge/wine-ge with lutris or heroic provides a solid alternative to games not on steam.

  • Vincente@lemmy.world
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    4 days ago

    Generally, Proton is enough for gaming.

    I use Tiny11 when I have to use Windows to run games.

    This modified Windows edition has no ads, no Edge browser, no forced online microsoft account, and no forced updates, so it’s a tolerable Windows edition.

    • jrgd@lemm.ee
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      5 days ago

      Tiny 11 comes in two variants:

      Tiny11 Core is not suitable for use on physical hardware as it outright disables updates. It’s best used for short-term VM instances.

      Tiny11 also has problems with updates. The advantages gained through Tiny11 will erode with applying Windows updates. The installer is more tolerable than Windows 11 by not forcing an online account (but still needing to touch telemetry settings). Components like Edge and One drive will inevitably rebuild themselves back in with cumulative updates. If this is something that coerces you to not update your system, don’t subject yourself to using Tiny11. Additionally Tiny11 fails to apply some cumulative updates out of the box, which could be a further security risk.

      I recently tested the main Tiny11 in a VM based on a different user recommending it in a now deleted thread. I was skeptical knowing the history of Tiny10 onward that 11 would actually be able to update properly, and NY findings backed up my initial skepticism of functional updates.

      • Vincente@lemmy.world
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        4 days ago

        Thanks for the long details, dude.

        I just use Windows to run games. I need nothing else on Windows. So Tiny11 is good enough for me.

        In terms of safety, I don’t store any information on Windows, so I never update it. It’s just a gaming tool for me.

        If my game accounts like Ubisoft, Steam, or GOG are leaked, it’s acceptable. They are just some email addresses and automatically generated passcodes, easy to update. It’s not important.

        And the file systems used by Windows and Linux partitions aren’t mutually readable, so running games on Windows is hardly likely to affect the safety of the Linux partition. It’s perfect.

    • RadDevonOP
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      5 days ago

      Ah, that’s very helpful. Thanks!

      Do you virtualize or dual boot?

      • Vincente@lemmy.world
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        5 days ago

        I use dual boot. Virtualization is a bit cumbersome and inefficient for me.

        I just use Windows to run games; I don’t do anything else on it. iPad/Linux is better for me.

  • soulsource@discuss.tchncs.de
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    6 days ago

    First things first: This hasn’t happened to me in ages. I even stopped looking at ProtonDB. Stuff just runs.

    However, if a game I buy really wouldn’t run on Linux, I would just refund it (if possible) and play something else. I have a pile of shame that could fill a hundred lifetimes, I really don’t need to play this one particular game.

  • ma1w4re@lemm.ee
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    4 days ago

    I stopped playing games. Honestly, they are more boring than lying around watching flys buzz.

  • Canary9341@lemmy.ml
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    6 days ago

    Dual boot, although I usually prefer to drop it rather than go to the trouble.

    I wouldn’t recommend virtualization, not only do you lose performance when you need it most, but (depending on the devices and system) setting everything up properly can be very tedious.

  • Omega_Jimes@lemmy.ca
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    6 days ago

    I have a dual boot partition, but honestly the games that don’t run are so few and far between that I really don’t bother…

    It’s like if you bought a Playstation, how do you play Xbox games? Unless it’s really worth it, you just don’t.

  • Domi@lemmy.secnd.me
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    5 days ago

    I used to have a second partition with Windows for such cases, but over time I just stopped bothering with those games.

    Now I just refund if it doesn’t work and move on in my to-play list.

    I still have a Windows VM for some applications and for doing firmware updates but I never bothered to set it up for playing games.

    • zod000@lemmy.ml
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      5 days ago

      Mostly same here, but (I have an SSD with W10 on it. I haven’t booted into my Windows drive since 2023. I only had a a few games installed on that drive, but it was also useful for the rare instance that I needed to some some propriety configuration utility.

  • emberpunk@lemmy.ml
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    6 days ago

    This might come off as an easy way out to your question, but very simply I just don’t bother with games that don’t run on linux. There’s enough really great titles that run great on linux, especially with the help of proton.

    I can’t be bothered with using windows anymore. It’s so bad. It’s very very bad, I rather do something else than have to play games under windows. I’ll only use windows if I absolutely m must, like for when I’m at work.

    • soulsource@discuss.tchncs.de
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      5 days ago

      This. I had written a similar last paragraph in my answer below, but decided to delete it before submitting.

      I have to suffer Windows at work. No way on earth this sad excuse for an operating system gets anywhere near my gaming PC. I want my gaming PC to be for fun stuff, not use it to torture myself.

  • KISSmyOSFeddit@lemmy.world
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    5 days ago

    (aside from leaving them behind)

    I do leave them behind. Same as with console exclusives or games for Macs (if they exist). If they don’t run on my system, I play some of the hundreds of thousands of games that do.

  • Deconceptualist@lemm.ee
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    6 days ago

    I switched fully to Linux on my main gaming PC about 18 months ago. Honestly Proton has become so good that I really haven’t had to dual-boot Windows or run a VM or anything. I even bought a licence for CrossOver when I first switched but ended up not needing it.

    For the few games that really won’t run (after trying what I find in ProtonDB and PCGW) I really do either A) wait for fixes, or B) just leave them behind. With a library of like 2500 games it’s not hard to find something else to play.

    These are the only games I recall not working at all for me:

    • Beyond Good & Evil (GOG) - Might be fixed now
    • Prince of Persia: Warrior Within (Steam) - Might be fixed now
    • Dauntless (EGS) - Broken due to Easy Anti-Cheat
  • CarbonScored [any]@hexbear.net
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    6 days ago

    For my sins, I do dual boot Windows 10. Though with wine and proton I reckon I can get ~80-90% of games to work.

    I’d love to go 100% Linux, and I do my best to only buy games that support Linux. But there are sadly some old games and multiplayer games with friends that I still can’t quite convince to work.

  • warmaster@lemmy.world
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    6 days ago

    I prefer to stand by companies that support my OS of choice. If they support me, I will pay them back. Otherwise I would be supporting them in ignoring my choices, so I put my money where my mouth is.